Sweet Eleanor Scarf/Wrap

Sweet Eleanor

Sweet Eleanor


This pattern was inspired by the Octoberfestdoily by Denise Owens. I wanted to make something special for my sister’s birthday. She likes simple elegance and warm tan/neutral shades so this was a natural choice.

The thread I used is quite a heavy thread from the Handweaver’s Studio and Gallery and it’s 50% cotton 50% linen. It is quite soft and has a nice rough texture that adds interest to the simple pattern. About 400m of similar weight thread should get you somethign a similar size. I used a 2mm hook.

Thanks to Lilacia on Ravelry for testing this for me. She used fingering weight yarn and suggests a size G hook i.e. 4mm from which I would conclude that she has a tighter tension than me (almost everyone does).

British notation is used. EDITED TO ADD: British double crochets are the same as American single crochets. Tension is not important.

Ch167.

R1. Dc in 2nd ch from hook. Dc in each remaining ch. Ch1 turn.

R2. *Dc5, ch6, sk 6st* rep from * 15 times. Dc in final dc. Ch1 turn.

R3. Dc in 1st st, *ch6, dc2 in loop, dc in next 4dc, sk1dc* rep from * 15 times. Do not ch. Turn.

R4. Slst in next dc, ch1, dc in same dc, dc in next 4dc, dc2 in loop, ch6. * Sk1dc, dc in next 5dc, dc2 in loop, ch6* rep 14 times. Dc in top of dc. Ch1 turn.

R5. Dc in 1st dc, *ch6, dc2 in loop, dc in next 6dc, sk1dc* rep from * 15 times. Do not ch. Turn.

R6. Slst in next dc, ch1, dc in same dc, dc in next 6dc, dc2 in loop, ch6. * Sk1dc, dc in next 7dc, dc2 in loop, ch6* rep 14 times. Dc in top of dc. Ch1 turn.

R7. Dc in 1st dc, *ch6, dc2 in loop, dc in next 8dc, sk1dc* rep from * 15 times. Do not ch. Turn.

R8. Slst in next dc, ch1, dc in same dc, dc in next 8dc, dc2 in loop, ch6. * Sk1dc, dc in next 9dc, dc2 in loop, ch6* rep 14 times. Dc in top of dc. Ch1 turn.

R9. Dc in 1st dc, *ch6, dc2 in loop, dc in next 10dc, sk1dc* rep from * 15 times. Do not ch. Turn.

Continue this stitch pattern until the scarf is the width that you are looking for.

EDITED TO ADD: Lots of people have asked in the comments what I mean by this and I apologise for not have clarified sooner. Each row you’ve worked so far has involved dc sections and chain sections. The chain sections stay the same length, the dc sections each get one stitch longer every row.

So on odd numbered rows you are working two dc stitches into the beginning of each chain loop on the row below and then skipping a stitch at the beginning of the next dc section. On even numbered rows you skip a dc before each chain section and work two dc into the chain loop on the row below after it. Using this pattern you continue to grow the dc sections as long as you want. I hope this helps.

Be aware that every row increases the length as well as the width. I did 35 rows.

Sweet Eleanor scarf detail

Sweet Eleanor detail

Final row should be an odd numbered row.

Final row: Dc in 1st dc. *Dc6 in loop, dc to next loop* rep from * to 1st from end. Sk final st. Bind off and weave in ends.

I chose not to block this scarf as I liked the way it was hanging already. You may decide yours needs blocking but I imagine the spiral shape  may make blocking tricky.

I am more proud of this pattern than anything else I’ve done. It feels like a big step up from some of the other things I’ve made.

As ever comments and questions are welcome.

EDITED in response to a question:

dc2 in loop = 2dc in loop created by the six chains not in any particular stitch. Sorry for lack of clarity!

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Baked avocados with garlic herb butter

Baked avocados? Baked avocados?

Oh yes. Definitely yes. Very definitely yes.

The idea for these came from the wonderful Leiths Vegetarian Bible by Polly Tyrer.  Her version has garlic herb cheese in it but I am a funny bunny and don’t like cheese. No not even cream cheese. Not even marscapone. I do like garlic butter though, so I took the cooking time and temp and made a new thing.

I must confess I’d had cooked avocados before in Ethiopian stews with chicken. They were delicious but pretty much buried under the flavour of the spices and the fire of the scotch bonnets. This recipe lets them shine and shine they do. They have a flavour a little bit like artichoke but really unlike anything else. What you really notice is the fantastic texture and the very enjoyable sense of eating a genuinely decadent tasting vegetarian dish.

This is also super quick and simple to make.

I’m going to give you a per avocado recipe and you can adapt it for the number of people you have. One avocado will serve one person as a main course or two as a substantial starter.

Garlic, herb and lemon butter

Garlic, herbs, lemon and butter are friends.

You will need:

1 ripe but firm avocado

1 dessert spoon softened butter

1/2 lemon

1 clove garlic

1 sprig each fresh thyme, sage and rosemary

salt and black pepper to taste

Set the oven to 200C/gas mark 6

Grate the zest from the lemon.  Chop the herbs very finely. Crush the garlic into a paste. Mash all of the above into the butter with a pinch of salt and a good grind of pepper.

Avocado fresh out the oven

Avocado fresh out the oven

Halve the avocado, remove the stone and peel.

Smear the avocado and fill the stone hole with the butter mixture. Place the avocado face down on a baking sheet. No need too butter the sheet because as you’ll see the the avocado is well  greased already and won’t stick.

Bake for ten minutes. No longer. Timing is important.

Serve with a wedge of lemon, a side salad and crusty bread. Drizzle the melted butter from the pan over the avocado.

Avocados ready to eat

Creamy, garlicky, herby goodness...

Feel smug that deliciousness is so bloody easy.