Hopefulness Scarf Pattern

Hopefulness scarf

Hopefulness scarf

This scarf was designed for a lovely friend of mine who has had some truly horrible times lately. Somehow she remains one of the sunniest people I know. I have been very affected by her courage and ability to look to the future.

I used one skein of Malabrigo lace to make this scarf i.e. just under 430m and a 2.25mm hook (US size B I think). I strongly suggest that you choose a solid colour yarn to make this scarf. Or at least a semi-solid with only a small amount of variation in depth and a single hue. The stitch pattern will be lost in a heavily  variegated yarn.

The finished project, once blocked, is approximately 150cm long and 30cm wide.

The pattern is deceptive. While it uses simple techniques and only four stitches, it is not easy to memorise and you will probably need to use the chart the whole way through. I did!

The stitches used in the chart are chain stitches, UK triple/ US double, UK triple two together /US double two  together. The edge  pattern which I have written out below also uses UK half treble/US half double crochet stitches. From now on I will use US notation.

Hopefulness Scarf detail

Hopefulness Scarf detail

The pattern is worked in two halves from the middle of the scarf outwards.

I apologise that this is a hand-drawn chart that I’ve scanned in. I have done my best to make it clear and easy to read but if anyone struggles I am very sorry.

Chain 74 stitches. This is the foundation chain. The first turning chain (shown on the chart) is not included in this number.

(An aside: The pattern repeat is 24 stitches wide. So to make the scarf wider or narrower chain a multiple of 24 plus 2.)

Then work according to the chart, starting with the turning chain of three.

My pattern testers suggested that placing a stitch marker after each repeat helped them to stay on track with the pattern.

Please note that the pattern looks neatest if you work the double crochets into the tops of the relevant chain stitches instead of around the chains. I know it’s quicker to work around the chain but it looks really sharp if you actually work into the stitches.

Another point to mention is that if you are working the chart correctly the double crochet stitches should create smoothly curving vertical lines. Please click on the detail picture above to see what I mean.

After working the chart twice through, work the edge.

Modelling the Hopefulness Scarf

Modelling the Hopefulness Scarf

Edge pattern:

1. Chain 2, work a row of half double crochets.

2. & 3. Chain 3, 3 doubles, *2 chain, skip 2 stitches, work a double crochet in each of the next 2  stitches, repeat from * until the last 4 stitches which are all doubles.

Repeat rows 1-3 then repeat row 1 as the final row. Bind off and weave in ends.

Attach the yarn to the reverse of the foundation chain and begin again with the chart.

To download the chart* click here: HopefulnessScarfChart

The scarf really benefits from blocking to straighten out the edges and open up the lace.

I hope you enjoy making this pattern.

For a variation, have a look at the chart. It is divided into two sections. If you just repeat the first section, instead of alternating with section two, you will also get a pretty lace but this time the arches will stack on top of each other instead of being offset like scales.

Thank you for reading, please send me comments or questions.

Special thanks to my volunteer pattern testers, Ravelry members: kimothy76, jacquimorse, Mshanane, SmallCrochet, AnarchyCox, wlindboe, lorithetrainer, ManicBeach, yarnedaround and funisinstyle.

*Extra super special thanks to Aparna Rolfe for making a professional quality chart for me on her pattern drawing software to replace my scruffy hand-drawn one. Her designs on Ravelry are well worth checking out by clicking her name. Lovely, stylish, contemporary  work.


We all fall down part 2.

When it comes to unfinished projects I have several that eye me from their bags and fill me sometimes with joy and sometimes with dread.

Pretty cardigan is too small for me.

Oops! Too small!

There is the top down cardigan that was too small when I first made it and had to be frogged back to above the waist. It’s almost done only the ribbing and buttons to go. It’s a very cute little garment made of hand dyed DK weight in shades of lilac, mauve, pink and grey. It’s also nowhere near going to fit me now. I’ve had to stop running due to an ankle injury and I’ve been working long hours and keeping my energy up with cake, chocolate and takeaways with inevitable results. I don’t mind getting fatter… much… but I do mind finishing a project after all this time only to find it won’t wrap around me. There’s little incentive to do the last bits of fiddly dull finishing work.

Then there’s the much more promising slouchy teal sweater. This is a simple two piece short sleaved layering piece with a boat neck and probably some decorative buttons on the shoulder which I have yet to find. I am in love with this project which I just know will be stylish and wearable and exactly what I need for the spring. But it’s all in plain slip stitch stockinette equivalent. There’s enough counting that I can’t really do it at knit night (and I’ve been too busy for knit night anyway recently) but it’s also too dull really to want to do at home. I need to just pick it up and do a row or two a day and then it’ll jog along nicely. Soon, soon.

There’s the Neverending Shrug of Doom which started out as a way to show off some gorgeous hand dyed silk yarn and has morphed into something rare and terrible with a life of its own. Nothing about this project has gone right. I have started off and frogged the silk itself several times. Then I got the silk right by deciding to use it as a collar for the shrug and bought some plain black wool for the body. Now the body is being a nuisance! I gave it an initial shot and got half way through before trying to pin it all togerther an see how it looked. Disastrous! The wool pulled on the silk and the collar looked mishapen and the torso hung away from my body in weird directions. This was not the glamourous vintage-inspired Hollywood diva-esque garment I had envisaged. This was a mess.

Madeline Tosh shawlette

So pretty but I'm halfway through the first skein already...

I found a fix for now. I am using measurements from a shrug I own that fits to make the pieces up in slip stitch. Except that at some point my tension changed and I made the second half of the front 1.5 times the size of the first half with the same yarn and hook. I may be the only person in the world who crochets even looser when she is stressed! Rip it, rip it and I’m trying again. I will succeed!

I have  the Sirdar Big Softie cushion covers to do. Just big spirals to sew together and fill. These will be lots of fun but I need to buy an extra ball of each colour first and as I bought the original balls in a shop on the other side of London I will have to phone up and order them to be sent over. I have started one of these.

I started a shawlette with the Madeline Tosh that Greentrianglegirl of A Playful Day gave me for my birthday then realised I needed another two skeins. Do they sell merino light in London? I should be so lucky! I will probably end up trading on Ravelry with someone in the States.

Crochet shawl motif pattern

Crochet shawl motif pattern

I have two lace shawls in process. One is a 1920s style shawl based on this square motif pattern that I have extended outwards and outwards.  The other is the final product that I am making with the recycled yarn I talked about in this post. I decided in the end to throw most of it out because winding it all without a swift and ballwinder would have been hellish. What I’ve got left will make a nice semicircular shawl and I’m using a doily pattern with a leaves and flowers theme to do that.

I’m making a cowl type neckwarmer for my sister in beeeeaaaaauuuutiful soft alpaca. This is a copy of the one I made for my mum for Christmas and should actually be done really soon. I can do this one on the train so it’s getting along nicely. I hope to post a joint celebration of both versions soon.

Finally there’s the fab handbag that I am storming through and need to find handles for. In my mind I’m thinking dark bamboo or semicircular wood. The yarn, not my usual taste, is a gift from lovely, lovely Rachel. (Cf the photos of my glazed carrot dish.) It’s Rowan Colourscape in the eye-popping Candy Pink colourway. Between the brightness and the chunkiness though it’s turning into a rocking handbag and the combination of self-striping yarn with tweed stitch is a winner.

I think that’s all my current UFOs. Of course I have two unstarted projects, a cardy for my sister and a lace scarf for a friend. The yarn is there, the will is there, but I feel that would be a new quantum leap in start-itis. I have decided that until at least one of the big projects is gone I won’t get going on another. Wish me luck though. I feel I have many miles before dawn…


Sweet Eleanor Scarf/Wrap

Sweet Eleanor

Sweet Eleanor


This pattern was inspired by the Octoberfestdoily by Denise Owens. I wanted to make something special for my sister’s birthday. She likes simple elegance and warm tan/neutral shades so this was a natural choice.

The thread I used is quite a heavy thread from the Handweaver’s Studio and Gallery and it’s 50% cotton 50% linen. It is quite soft and has a nice rough texture that adds interest to the simple pattern. About 400m of similar weight thread should get you somethign a similar size. I used a 2mm hook.

Thanks to Lilacia on Ravelry for testing this for me. She used fingering weight yarn and suggests a size G hook i.e. 4mm from which I would conclude that she has a tighter tension than me (almost everyone does).

British notation is used. EDITED TO ADD: British double crochets are the same as American single crochets. Tension is not important.

Ch167.

R1. Dc in 2nd ch from hook. Dc in each remaining ch. Ch1 turn.

R2. *Dc5, ch6, sk 6st* rep from * 15 times. Dc in final dc. Ch1 turn.

R3. Dc in 1st st, *ch6, dc2 in loop, dc in next 4dc, sk1dc* rep from * 15 times. Do not ch. Turn.

R4. Slst in next dc, ch1, dc in same dc, dc in next 4dc, dc2 in loop, ch6. * Sk1dc, dc in next 5dc, dc2 in loop, ch6* rep 14 times. Dc in top of dc. Ch1 turn.

R5. Dc in 1st dc, *ch6, dc2 in loop, dc in next 6dc, sk1dc* rep from * 15 times. Do not ch. Turn.

R6. Slst in next dc, ch1, dc in same dc, dc in next 6dc, dc2 in loop, ch6. * Sk1dc, dc in next 7dc, dc2 in loop, ch6* rep 14 times. Dc in top of dc. Ch1 turn.

R7. Dc in 1st dc, *ch6, dc2 in loop, dc in next 8dc, sk1dc* rep from * 15 times. Do not ch. Turn.

R8. Slst in next dc, ch1, dc in same dc, dc in next 8dc, dc2 in loop, ch6. * Sk1dc, dc in next 9dc, dc2 in loop, ch6* rep 14 times. Dc in top of dc. Ch1 turn.

R9. Dc in 1st dc, *ch6, dc2 in loop, dc in next 10dc, sk1dc* rep from * 15 times. Do not ch. Turn.

Continue this stitch pattern until the scarf is the width that you are looking for.

EDITED TO ADD: Lots of people have asked in the comments what I mean by this and I apologise for not have clarified sooner. Each row you’ve worked so far has involved dc sections and chain sections. The chain sections stay the same length, the dc sections each get one stitch longer every row.

So on odd numbered rows you are working two dc stitches into the beginning of each chain loop on the row below and then skipping a stitch at the beginning of the next dc section. On even numbered rows you skip a dc before each chain section and work two dc into the chain loop on the row below after it. Using this pattern you continue to grow the dc sections as long as you want. I hope this helps.

Be aware that every row increases the length as well as the width. I did 35 rows.

Sweet Eleanor scarf detail

Sweet Eleanor detail

Final row should be an odd numbered row.

Final row: Dc in 1st dc. *Dc6 in loop, dc to next loop* rep from * to 1st from end. Sk final st. Bind off and weave in ends.

I chose not to block this scarf as I liked the way it was hanging already. You may decide yours needs blocking but I imagine the spiral shape  may make blocking tricky.

I am more proud of this pattern than anything else I’ve done. It feels like a big step up from some of the other things I’ve made.

As ever comments and questions are welcome.

EDITED in response to a question:

dc2 in loop = 2dc in loop created by the six chains not in any particular stitch. Sorry for lack of clarity!


An quick update and a new FO!

I am so sorry not to have been posting lately. I have had personal reasons with which I won’t bore you all. However I have a cake recipe sat in storage waiting for me to finish tweaking and get some decent photos taken.

I also have some lovely FOs to share one of which I will put up today. My red shawl is complete!

Look! Pretty innit?

Red wool thread shawl

Red wool thread shawl

I am really happy with this. I had to frog and re-work the last three rows about four times in order to have enough thread but in the end it’s worked out nicely.

Blocking this made a huge difference. It increased about a third in size and the lovely open texture of the single crochets made itself clear. (Yes I have the world’s loosest tension.) I also finished the grey cardigan in my WIP Weds post and frogged the blue one. I know some people will be disappointed but as I said in the post I do actually already have one like it and it was really a second attempt. I decided it just wasn’t worth it. I have steam blocked both cardies now and will put up photos soon.

Blocking red thread shawl

Blocking red thread shawl

Red thread shawl close up

Red thread shawl close up


Work in Progress Wednesday Take 1

Top of chevron lace cardigan

Top of chevron lace cardigan

Tami’s Amis started a Work in Progress Wednesdays Meme which I thought was a good idea.

I’m not sure I’m going to be able to make this is a regular feature as my work life is picking up at the moment but I thought I’d join in this time as it sounds fun.

At the moment I have all sorts of work mid-hook. I really need to get cracking and finish a few of them but I have been trying to learn patience from my knitting friends and make some more substantial and satisfying garments.

There are two cardigans. One is a navy blue chevron lace cardigan based on this pattern from Without Seams. It is a second attempt because although I like the first attempt I wanted to adapt the pattern a little. It’s a very simple adaptable top down pattern.

The second is a top down slip stitch crochet cardigan with a decorative yolk and a plain body. I am currently trying to decide whether it will have sleeves.

First attempt at slip stitching

First attempt at slip stitching

Both of the above are in horrid Robin acrylic DK. I don’t use this yarn except as an experimental yarn. I lack confidence when it comes to bigger garments with shaping and so on so I have shied away from using nice yarn until I feel I’ve got the hang of this a bit better. I had (along with so many others) a very expensive mistake in my past which I may tell you some time if you ask nicely.

That said the slip stitch cardy looks remarkably classy even so. Something in the texture is bringing out the best in the yarn. It’s creating a depth and variation of colour that doesn’t actually exist.

I’m somewhat thrilled to have discovered slip stitching because it’s a way of making crochet more solid and drapey. It has a subtlety that normal crochet lacks and can make things that look not dissimilar to knitting. So yay for more variety of styling in my craft! Also yay for knit look garments that take less time than knitting. (Although they are still slower than ordinary crochet.)

Sexy red lace

Sexy red lace

Then there is a lace thread shawlette. It’s pure deep red wool and is a straightforward lace shawlette. I have been a little bit uncertain about this from time to time as the lace was less delicate than I had originally hoped. Also I  haven’t been able to keep track of the stitch count very effectively so there’s been some ruffling and cupping to contend with.

Still it looks pretty good actually on and I’m feeling more confident that it’ll be pretty once it’s finished.  When I get to the outer edge I’m going to add some more lace to that too. I’m really hoping it’ll block out well.

Although the shawlette and the slip stitch cardy are all improvised I’m not going to be putting the patterns up. I don’t want to have to work out sizing for the cardy and to be honest I can’t remember how I did the shawlette. They are all just going to have to be one offs.

Hurry up and dry!

Hurry up and dry!

I have another project on the go which I can’t talk about because I think it’s going to be a gift. It just depends on how it turns out. I’m having lots of fun with another new technique but I don’t know whether it will be good enough to actually give to someone.

Finally I have unravelled a cashmere cardigan of mine that got moth holes and anyway never really suited me. The colour was way too bright. I’ve dyed the yarn with a navy dye and am currently waiting for it to dry. So this is a pre-work in progress.

If I really concentrated the chevron lace cardigan could be an FO in no time but I’m enjoying it less than the lace and the slip stitch so I’m being lazy with it. The gift has some complicated aspects that have held it back a little but I need to grit my teeth and give it another go. The slip stitch is just a mindless project great for sitting in front of the TV and the red shawlette fits in a bag and is good for when I’m out and about. Of cours what I suspect will happen is that I will finish none of them but will instead start on something with my newly dyed cashmere…


New pretty things…

So I’ve finished the patterns I was designing on the tube when I had my conversation with the charming book-binder the other day. They are a little bit out of season, especially given what a gorgeous spring we’re having, but they’re done and they are, if I say so myself, as cute as pie. Look!

Hat and gloves for Martina's kits

Hat and gloves for Martina's kits

The stitch is a new one I made up which I think I’m going to name the raised shell stitch. It’s actually quite simple to do and gives this neat effect of making the shells stand out from the fabric each one making a kind of little pocket.

In fact I think two nice ways to personalise this pattern would be:

1. To edge the hat/gloves and the edges of the shells with a contrasting colour yarnto make them stand out more.

2.  To sew a small button or bead into the opening of the pocket of each shell making it look sort of like a flowerbud.

Now as much as I’d love to give all you lovely people this pattern for free I’m afraid I’ve made a promise with this one. It’s going to my dear friend Martina at Yarn To Knit. She’s going to be making these up into kits with each one getting the pattern for the hat or the gloves, a hook and enough of her beautiful hand dyed DK yarn to make them up.

I’m going to visit Martina tomorrow, to take pretty photos as my camera is just the diddly one in my phone. (You might have noticed the less than stellar quality of my pictures.) It’s been hard work making patterns to spec but also one that has spurred me on and I have learnt a great deal.

The hat and gloves are going to Martina for samples and we’ll both be at the Spitalfields City Farm Sheep and Wool Fayre so you can come and see them in real life, meet us and say ‘hi’ and get your hands on some of her scumptious yarn. I’d love to see you there.

Modelling Hebe Hat

Modelling Hebe Hat


Spring grass beret

Spring grass beret

Spring grass beret

Man I am on fire with the patterns right now! But it’s just because I love you.

This cute little beret came from the weekly designers mini-challenge on Ravelry. The challenge was to produce an item with the  following features:

Object: Hat
Theme: Springtime! But flowers are not allowed!
Technique: Must incorporate double crochet* (for crocheters) and nupps (for knitters).

*American notation i.e. British triple crochets

I have some lovely green cashmere I’m recycling out of a cardigan that’s become too small for me (and got moth holes grrrrr!) . Double stranded it’s like 2ply laceweight and is strong enough to work. Single ply it’s just too breakable.

I reckon you should be able to make this easily with 50g of 2ply laceweight yarn. I weighed the finished object at about 30g. I need to get some digital scales  to help me calculate meterage.

Close up of rows 1-5

Close up of rows 1-5

I used a 2mm hook and the first 5 rounds should measure 9cm (3.5in) across. Use whatever hook you need to get your gauge right. To be honest this pattern can safely be worked up a little looser gauge than I’ve made it if you’d like a little more slouchy look.

I’ll be using British notation to write this up. Do not turn at the end of rounds.

Dc= Double crochet,  Tr= Triple crochet, Htr= Half triple crochet, Ch= Chain, Tr2tog = Triple 2 together, [ ]= repeat section between brackets the given number of times, Sk = skip e.g. Sk2ch means skip the next 2 chain stitches Slst = slip stitch, Sp= space.

To Tr2tog yarn over, insert hook into next stitch draw up a loop, yarn over and draw through two loops, yarn over and insert into next stitch, draw up another loop, yarn over and draw through two loops, yarn over and draw through all three loops on hook.)

Where the pattern says to “Slst in 3rd Ch to join” it means the 3rd chain of the current row i.e. the 3rd of the vertical chains with which you began the row.

All photos in this post are copyright of the fabulously talented Miss South of North/South Food April 2011.

Make a magic ring and Ch 3.

R1. Tr 19 times in the ring. Sl st in 3rd Ch to join. Ch 1.

Edited to correct: R2. Dc in each tr. Sl st in 1st Ch to join. Ch 5.

R3. [Tr 2 Ch2] 9 times. Tr and Slst to 3rd Ch to join. Ch 5.

R4. [Sk2ch, 2Tr in each of the next 2 Tr, Ch2] 9 times. Sk2ch,  2Tr in next Tr, Tr in next Tr. Slst in 3rd Ch to join. Ch6.

R5. [Sk2ch, Tr in each of next 4Tr, Ch3] 9 times. Sk2ch, Tr in each of next 3 Tr, Sl st in 3rd Ch to join. Ch9.

R6. [Sk3ch, Tr in each of next 4 Tr, Ch6] 9 times. Sk3ch, Tr in each of next 3Tr, Sl st in 3rd ch to join. Ch6.

R7. [Tr in Ch6Sp, Ch3 Tr in next 3 Tr, 2Tr in next Tr, Ch3] 9 times. Tr in Ch6Sp, Ch3, Tr in next 4 Tr. Slst in 3rd Ch to join. Ch6.

R8. [Sk3ch, 3Tr in next Tr, Ch3, Sk3ch, Tr in next 5 Tr, Ch3] 9 times. Sk3ch, 3Tr in next Tr, Ch3, Sk3ch, Tr in next 4 Tr. Slst in 3rd Ch to join. Ch5.

R9. [Sk3ch, 2Tr in each of next 3Tr, Ch2, Sk3ch, Tr in next 5Tr, Ch2] 9 times. Sk3ch, 2Tr in each of next 3Tr, Ch2, Sk2ch, Tr in next 4 Tr. Slst in 3rd Ch to join. Ch5.

R10. [Sk2ch, 2Tr in next Tr, Tr in next 2Tr, Ch2, Tr in next 2Tr, 2Tr in next Tr, Ch2, Sk2ch, Tr2tog, Tr, Tr2tog, Ch2] 9 times.  Sk2ch, 2Tr in next Tr, Tr in next 2Tr, Ch2, Tr in next 2Tr, 2Tr in next Tr, Ch2, Sk2ch, Tr2tog, Tr in next 2Tr. Sl st in 3rd Ch to join. Ch5.

R11. [Sk2ch, 2Tr in next Tr, Tr in next 3Tr, Ch3 Sk2ch, Tr in next 3Tr, 2Tr in next Tr, Ch2, Sk2ch, Tr2tog, Tr, Ch2] 9 times. Sk2ch, 2Tr in next Tr, Tr in next 3Tr, Ch3, Sk2ch, Tr in next 3Tr, 2Tr in next Tr, Ch2, Sk2ch, Tr2tog. Sl st in 3rd Ch to join. Ch5.

R12. [Sk2ch, 2Tr in next Tr, Tr in next 4Tr, Ch4 Sk3ch, Tr in next 4Tr, 2Tr in next Tr, Ch2, Sk2ch, Tr2tog, Ch2] 9 times. Sk2ch, 2Tr in next Tr, Tr in next 4Tr, Ch4, Sk3ch, Tr in next 4Tr, 2Tr in next Tr, Ch2, Sk2ch, Tr in next Tr. Sl st in 3rd Ch to join. Ch5.

R13. [Sk2ch, 2Tr in next Tr, Tr in next 5Tr, Ch4 Sk4ch, Tr in next 5Tr, 2Tr in next Tr, Ch2, Sk2ch, Tr in next Tr, Ch2] 9 times. Sk2ch, 2Tr in next Tr, Tr in next 5Tr, Ch4 Sk4ch, Tr in next 5Tr, 2Tr in next Tr, Ch2, Sk2ch. Sl st in 3rd Ch to join. Ch6.

R14. [Sk2ch, Tr in next 7Tr, Ch4 Sk4ch, Tr in next 7Tr, Ch3, Sk2ch, Tr in next Tr, Ch3] 9 times. Sk2ch, Tr in next 7Tr, Ch4 Sk4ch, Tr in next 7Tr, Ch3, Sk2ch. Sl st in 3rd Ch to join. Ch6.

R15. [Sk3ch, Tr2tog, Tr in next 5Tr, Ch3 Sk4ch, Tr in next 5Tr, Tr2tog, Ch3, Sk3ch, 2Tr in next Tr, Ch3] 9 times. Sk3ch, Tr2tog, Tr in next 5Tr, Ch3, Sk4ch, Tr in next 5Tr, Tr2tog, Ch3, Sk3ch, Tr in next Tr. Sl st in 3rd Ch to join. Ch5.

R16. [Sk3ch, Tr2tog, Tr in next 4Tr, Ch2, Sk3ch, Tr in next 4Tr, Tr2tog, Ch2, Sk3ch, Tr in next 2Tr, Ch2] 9 times. Sk3ch, Tr2tog, Tr in next 4Tr, Ch2, Sk3ch, Tr in next 4Tr, Tr2tog, Ch2, Sk3ch, Tr in next Tr. Sl st in 3rd Ch to join. Ch5.

R17. [Sk2ch, Tr2tog, Tr in next 3Tr, Ch2, Sk2ch, Tr in next 3Tr, Tr2tog, Ch2, Sk2ch, Tr2tog, Ch2] 9 times. Sk2ch, Tr2tog, Tr in next 3Tr, Ch2, Sk2ch, Tr in next 3Tr, Tr2tog, Ch2, Sk2ch, Tr in next Tr. Sl st in 3rd Ch to join. Ch5.

R18. [Sk2ch, Tr2tog, Tr in next 2Tr, Ch, Sk2ch, Tr in next 2Tr, Tr2tog, Ch2, Sk2ch, Tr in next Tr, Ch2] 9 times. Sk2ch, Tr2tog, Tr in next 2Tr, Ch, Sk2ch, Tr in next 2Tr, Tr2tog, Ch2, Sk2ch.  Sl st in 3rd Ch to join. Ch5.

R19. [Sk2ch, Tr2tog, Tr, Ch, Sk, Tr in next Tr, Tr2tog, Ch2, Sk2ch, Tr in next Tr, Ch2] 9 times. Sk2ch, Tr2tog, Tr, Ch, Sk, Tr in next Tr, Tr2tog, Ch2, Sk2ch.  Sl st in 3rd Ch to join. Ch2

R20. Htr all around. Slst in 2nd Ch to join. Finish off and work in ends.

As ever comments and clarifications are welcome. This should be a fairly quick and easy project for all that the instructions might look a bit complicated. I think it would look really nice in sunny autumnal colours too!

The finished beret

The finished beret

Oo la la!

Oo la la!


Waltzing Fans Shawl

Waltzing Fans shawl

Waltzing fans shawl

I made this pretty shawl out of wool ‘worsted’ thread from The Handweaver’s Studio I think it could equally be made from lace weight yarn without any problems and would be larger and more of a shawl rather than perhaps a shawlette!

I used 50g of the thread which wasn’t marked for meterage. I couldn’t say I’m afraid how much lace weight you would need. I’m going to guess at 100-150g and hide behind the sofa when you throw missiles at me for getting it wrong.

If you make this pattern in laceweight yarn please let me know what meterage you used in the comments!

EDIT: I also used a 2mm hook.

I call it the waltzing fans because the edge of the shawl has a ripple on it like dancers rising and falling as they waltz round the ballroom.

It is based on the fan stitch octagon from Melody Griffiths’ 201 Crochet Motifs Blocks Projects and Ideas but only half the round is completed before turning and the pattern is expanded with a pretty edging.

Instructions as follows:

Notation British. ch= chain, dc= double crochet, tr= treble, sl st= slip stitch, sp= space, [] repeat direction in brackets as directed, fan = 3tr 1ch 3tr

Make 8ch. Sl st in 1st ch to form a ring.

R1. 4ch [3tr in ring 1ch] 7 times. 2tr in ring. sl st in 3rd ch

R2. Sl st in 1st sp. 4ch 3tr in same sp.  [1ch make fan in next sp] 3 times.  1ch 3tr in next sp 1ch 1tr in same sp. ch4 turn.

R3. 3tr in ch1 sp. [1ch 1tr in next sp, 1ch 1fan in next space] 3 times. 1ch 1tr in next sp, 1ch 3tr in next sp 1ch 1tr in same sp. ch4 turn. (1 tr between each fan)

R4. 3tr in ch1 sp. *[1ch 1tr in next sp] twice  1ch 1fan in next space repeat section from* 3 times. [1ch 1tr in next sp] twice, 1ch 3tr in next sp 1ch 1tr in same sp. ch4 turn. (2 tr between each fan)

R5-R12. As for R3 and R4 Start each row 3tr in ch1 sp. Alternate 1ch 1tr across between each fan or edging. Each tr to be worked into the ch1 sp below. Between each fan or edging (half fan) the number of times you [1ch 1tr] increases  by 1 with each row i.e. for R5 there are 3 tr between each fan for R6 there are 4tr between each fan etc. Fans should always line up and be worked into the ch1 sp of the fan below. Count carefully it is easy to miss a tr into the spaces next to fans. At the end of each row work 3tr into final sp 1ch 1tr into same sp. 4ch and turn.

First few rows of the shawl

First few rows of the shawl

You should have between each fan:

R5.  [1ch 1tr] 3 times and 1ch

R6. [1ch 1tr] 4 times and 1ch

R7. [1ch 1tr] 5 times and 1ch

R8. [1ch 1tr] 6 times and 1ch

R9. [1ch 1tr] 7 times and 1ch

R10. [1ch 1tr] 8 times and 1ch

R11. [1ch 1tr] 9 times and 1ch

R12. [1ch 1tr] 10 times and 1ch

R13. 3tr in ch1 sp. *[1ch 1tr in next sp] 6 times 1ch 1tr in same sp [1ch 1tr in next sp] 5 times, 1ch 1fan in next space, repeat section from * 3 times. [1ch 1tr in next sp] 6 times 1ch 1tr in same sp [1ch 1tr in next sp] 5 times, 1ch 3tr in final sp 1ch 1tr in same sp. ch4 turn.

R14. 3tr in ch1 sp. *[1ch 1tr in next sp] 5 times 1ch sk 1 sp, 1fan in 2nd sp, [1ch 1tr in next sp] 5 times, 1ch 1fan in next space,

repeat section from * 3 times. [1ch 1tr in next sp] 5 times 1ch sk 1 sp, 1fan in 2nd sp, [1ch 1tr in next sp] 5 times, 1ch 3tr in final sp 1ch 1tr in same sp. 4ch and turn.

R15 – R23. Begin each row 3tr in ch1 sp. *Work [1ch 1tr in next sp] across to next fan. Fan in next fan sp. Repeatfrom *  across row until edging is reached end each row with 3tr in final sp 1ch 1tr in same sp, 4ch turn.

You should have between each fan or edging section:

R15. [1ch 1tr] 6 times and 1ch

R16. [1ch 1tr] 7 times and 1ch

R17. [1ch 1tr] 8 times and 1ch

R18. [1ch 1tr] 9 times and 1ch

R19. [1ch 1tr] 10 times and 1ch

R20. [1ch 1tr] 11 times and 1ch

R21. [1ch 1tr] 12 times and 1ch

R22. [1ch 1tr] 13 times and 1ch

R23. [1ch 1tr] 14 times and 1ch

R24. 3tr in ch1 sp. *[1ch 1tr in next sp] 8 times 1ch 1tr in same sp [1ch 1tr in next sp] 7 times, 1ch 1fan in next space, repeat section from * 7 times. [1ch 1tr in next sp] 8 times 1ch 1tr in same sp [1ch 1tr in next sp] 7 times, 1ch 3tr in final sp 1ch 1tr in same sp. ch4 turn.

R25. 3tr in ch1 sp. *[1ch 1tr in next sp] 7 times 1ch sk 1 sp, 1fan in 2nd sp, [1ch 1tr in next sp] 7 times, 1ch 1fan in next space, repeat section from * 7 times. [1ch 1tr in next sp] 7 times 1ch sk 1 sp, 1fan in 2nd sp, [1ch 1tr in next sp] 7 times, 1ch 3tr in final sp 1ch 1tr in same sp. 4ch turn.

R26 – R33. Begin each row 3tr in ch1 sp. *Work [1ch 1tr in next sp] across to next fan. Fan in next fan sp. Repeat from * across row until edging is reached end each row with 3tr in final sp 1ch 1tr in same sp, 4ch turn.

You should have between each fan or edging section:

This pattern really needs blocking

This pattern really needs blocking

R26. [1ch 1tr] 8 times and 1ch

R27. [1ch 1tr]9 times and 1ch

R28. [1ch 1tr] 10 times and 1ch

R29. [1ch 1tr] 11 times and 1ch

R30. [1ch 1tr] 12 times and 1ch

R31. [1ch 1tr] 13 times and 1ch

R32. [1ch 1tr] 14 times and 1ch

R33. [1ch 1tr] 15 times and 1ch

R34 As for R26-33 but only 1ch at end. Turn.

R35. Dc to end of row. Ch4 turn.

R36-38 See diagram.

Any questions or clarifications please let me know in the comments and I will try to sort you out as soon as possible. Enjoy!


Apology

So… I have been meaning to post about my lovely shawl which I blocked all  of a couple of weeks ago now.

I didn’t want to post about it without the pattern and getting the pattern written up has been something of a faff. So in the meantime here are some pretty pictures. I promise the pattern with charts will be up shortly.

Waltzing Fans Shawl

Waltzing Fans Shawl

Waltzing fans at the window

Waltzing fans at the window

Sorry.


1950s-style wide brimmed hat

EDITED TO ADD:

This is an old pattern. It’s the first one I wrote up and looking back on it I’m not sure it’s that great. If you want to make it please do go ahead but I’m kind of embarrassed by it nowadays. I apologise for my poor pattern writing skills.
I was stuck on another project which I will write up very soon. A bag made out of string which I refer to as the picnic bag because it’s summery and cream coloured and makes me think of going on picnics. So while I was going thorugh my third attempt at this bag which had got me properly peeved I decided to cheer myself up with something creative and fun on the side. Hence this matching hat.

1950s style wide brimmed hat on table

The hat is made out of normal string from the corner store. The kind of stuff you use in the garden for tying back the honeysuckle or to send a parcel to your auntie. It’s stiffish stuff which leaves you with a bit of cramp in your hook holding muscles if you work with it for too long at a stretch, but also means it holds a shape well.For example making a reasonable brim.

I also used a second type of softer cotton string to make the decorative band although I think any cotton yarn would also be good. I think this could look very chic with the band done in black.

I couldn’t say how many balls of string went into this because what with all the balls I bought for the bag and the amount of hooking and ripping I had to do to get the bag right I lost track. I think you’d need between two and three small balls and less than 50g of the cotton for the hat band.

So… here’s the pattern please comment if anything’s not clear:

This pattern is worked in the round. I am using American notation. sc= single crochet, sl st= slip stitch, ch=chain

R1: With string and a size 6mm (size J) hook make a magic loop and sc into the loop six times. Join with a sl st in 1st sc. Pull tight.

R2: Ch 1, 2sc in each sc around. Join with a sl st in 1st sc.

R3: Ch1, *sc in next sc, 2sc in next sc, repeat from * around. Join with a sl st in 1st sc.

R4: Ch1, *2sc in next sc, sc in next 2sc, repeat from * around. Join with a sl st in 1st sc.

R5: Ch1, *sc in next 3 sc, 2sc in next sc, repeat from * around. Join with  a sl st in 1st sc.

R6: Ch1, sc in next sc, 2sc in next sc, *sc in next 4 sc, 2sc in next sc repeat from * around until last 3sc, sc in last 3sc. Join with a sl st in 1st sc.

R7  & R8: Ch1, sc in each sc around. Join with a sl st in 1st sc.

R9: Ch1, *sc in next 5sc, 2sc in next sc repeat from * around. Join with a sl st in 1st sc.

R10 & R11: Ch1, sc in each sc around. Join with a sl st in 1st sc.

R12: Ch1, sc in next 2sc, 2sc in next sc, *sc in next 6sc, 2sc in next sc repeat from* around until last 4sc. Sc in last 4sc. Join with a sl st in 1st sc.

R13: Ch 1, *sc in next 7 sc, 2 sc in next sc; rep from * around; join with sl st in 1st sc.

R14: Ch 1, sc in next 3 sc, 2 sc in next sc, *sc in next 8 sc, 2 sc in next sc; rep from * around to last 5 sc, sc in last 5 sc; join with sl st in 1st sc.

R15: Ch 1, *sc in next 9 sc, 2 sc in next sc; rep from * around; join with sl st in first sc – 66 sc at the end of this rnd.

R16: Ch 1, sc in next 4 sc, 2 sc in next sc, *sc in next 10 sc, 2 sc in next sc; rep from * around to last 6 sc, sc in last 6 sc; join with sl st in 1st sc.

R17: Ch 1, *sc in next 11 sc, 2 sc in next sc; rep from * around; join with sl st in 1st sc.

R18: Ch 1, sc in next 5 sc, 2 sc in next sc, *sc in next 12 sc, 2 sc in next sc; rep from * around to last 7 sc, sc in last 7 sc; join with sl st in 1st sc.

R19: Ch 1, *sc in next 13 sc, 2 sc in next sc; rep from * around; join with sl st in 1st sc.

R20: Ch 1, sc in next 6 sc, 2 sc in next sc, *sc in next 14 sc, 2 sc in next sc; rep from * around to last 8 sc, sc in last 8 sc; join with sl st in 1st sc.

Fasten off and weave in end.

Make a loop with string. Inside hat find row 13. Pass new loop through a loop of row 13 and sc around inside hat attaching to loops in row 13. Join with a sl st in 1st sc. Ch1 sc in all sc around. Join with a sl st in 1st sc.

EDITED TO ADD: Try the hat on to check whether the crown is deep enough. If not add another row or two of single crochets at this point.

Fasten off.

You should have something that looks a bit like this:

Inside 1950s style wide brimmed hat

Now for decoration. You will notice that there is now a pronounced ridge in the hat where you’ve attached the section inside. We don’t want that now do we?

So let’s make a band to cover it up. Using your cotton and a size 3mm hook make a chain long enough to wrap around that section of the hat and leave a couple of neat little tails. If you want to tie a bow in the band make it long enough for that. To be honest this is up to you so  no need to count stitches here just eyeball it!

Sc in 2nd ch from hook and in each ch to end. Ch1 and turn, sc in each sc to end. Fasten off and weave in ends.

Wrap band around hat on top of ridge at row 13. Pin in place and sew down. Remove the pins and hooray, your hat is ready to wear!

I wear my pretty retro hat

Modelling my 1950s wide brimmed hat