Spring grass beret

Spring grass beret

Spring grass beret

Man I am on fire with the patterns right now! But it’s just because I love you.

This cute little beret came from the weekly designers mini-challenge on Ravelry. The challenge was to produce an item with the  following features:

Object: Hat
Theme: Springtime! But flowers are not allowed!
Technique: Must incorporate double crochet* (for crocheters) and nupps (for knitters).

*American notation i.e. British triple crochets

I have some lovely green cashmere I’m recycling out of a cardigan that’s become too small for me (and got moth holes grrrrr!) . Double stranded it’s like 2ply laceweight and is strong enough to work. Single ply it’s just too breakable.

I reckon you should be able to make this easily with 50g of 2ply laceweight yarn. I weighed the finished object at about 30g. I need to get some digital scales  to help me calculate meterage.

Close up of rows 1-5

Close up of rows 1-5

I used a 2mm hook and the first 5 rounds should measure 9cm (3.5in) across. Use whatever hook you need to get your gauge right. To be honest this pattern can safely be worked up a little looser gauge than I’ve made it if you’d like a little more slouchy look.

I’ll be using British notation to write this up. Do not turn at the end of rounds.

Dc= Double crochet,  Tr= Triple crochet, Htr= Half triple crochet, Ch= Chain, Tr2tog = Triple 2 together, [ ]= repeat section between brackets the given number of times, Sk = skip e.g. Sk2ch means skip the next 2 chain stitches Slst = slip stitch, Sp= space.

To Tr2tog yarn over, insert hook into next stitch draw up a loop, yarn over and draw through two loops, yarn over and insert into next stitch, draw up another loop, yarn over and draw through two loops, yarn over and draw through all three loops on hook.)

Where the pattern says to “Slst in 3rd Ch to join” it means the 3rd chain of the current row i.e. the 3rd of the vertical chains with which you began the row.

All photos in this post are copyright of the fabulously talented Miss South of North/South Food April 2011.

Make a magic ring and Ch 3.

R1. Tr 19 times in the ring. Sl st in 3rd Ch to join. Ch 1.

Edited to correct: R2. Dc in each tr. Sl st in 1st Ch to join. Ch 5.

R3. [Tr 2 Ch2] 9 times. Tr and Slst to 3rd Ch to join. Ch 5.

R4. [Sk2ch, 2Tr in each of the next 2 Tr, Ch2] 9 times. Sk2ch,  2Tr in next Tr, Tr in next Tr. Slst in 3rd Ch to join. Ch6.

R5. [Sk2ch, Tr in each of next 4Tr, Ch3] 9 times. Sk2ch, Tr in each of next 3 Tr, Sl st in 3rd Ch to join. Ch9.

R6. [Sk3ch, Tr in each of next 4 Tr, Ch6] 9 times. Sk3ch, Tr in each of next 3Tr, Sl st in 3rd ch to join. Ch6.

R7. [Tr in Ch6Sp, Ch3 Tr in next 3 Tr, 2Tr in next Tr, Ch3] 9 times. Tr in Ch6Sp, Ch3, Tr in next 4 Tr. Slst in 3rd Ch to join. Ch6.

R8. [Sk3ch, 3Tr in next Tr, Ch3, Sk3ch, Tr in next 5 Tr, Ch3] 9 times. Sk3ch, 3Tr in next Tr, Ch3, Sk3ch, Tr in next 4 Tr. Slst in 3rd Ch to join. Ch5.

R9. [Sk3ch, 2Tr in each of next 3Tr, Ch2, Sk3ch, Tr in next 5Tr, Ch2] 9 times. Sk3ch, 2Tr in each of next 3Tr, Ch2, Sk2ch, Tr in next 4 Tr. Slst in 3rd Ch to join. Ch5.

R10. [Sk2ch, 2Tr in next Tr, Tr in next 2Tr, Ch2, Tr in next 2Tr, 2Tr in next Tr, Ch2, Sk2ch, Tr2tog, Tr, Tr2tog, Ch2] 9 times.  Sk2ch, 2Tr in next Tr, Tr in next 2Tr, Ch2, Tr in next 2Tr, 2Tr in next Tr, Ch2, Sk2ch, Tr2tog, Tr in next 2Tr. Sl st in 3rd Ch to join. Ch5.

R11. [Sk2ch, 2Tr in next Tr, Tr in next 3Tr, Ch3 Sk2ch, Tr in next 3Tr, 2Tr in next Tr, Ch2, Sk2ch, Tr2tog, Tr, Ch2] 9 times. Sk2ch, 2Tr in next Tr, Tr in next 3Tr, Ch3, Sk2ch, Tr in next 3Tr, 2Tr in next Tr, Ch2, Sk2ch, Tr2tog. Sl st in 3rd Ch to join. Ch5.

R12. [Sk2ch, 2Tr in next Tr, Tr in next 4Tr, Ch4 Sk3ch, Tr in next 4Tr, 2Tr in next Tr, Ch2, Sk2ch, Tr2tog, Ch2] 9 times. Sk2ch, 2Tr in next Tr, Tr in next 4Tr, Ch4, Sk3ch, Tr in next 4Tr, 2Tr in next Tr, Ch2, Sk2ch, Tr in next Tr. Sl st in 3rd Ch to join. Ch5.

R13. [Sk2ch, 2Tr in next Tr, Tr in next 5Tr, Ch4 Sk4ch, Tr in next 5Tr, 2Tr in next Tr, Ch2, Sk2ch, Tr in next Tr, Ch2] 9 times. Sk2ch, 2Tr in next Tr, Tr in next 5Tr, Ch4 Sk4ch, Tr in next 5Tr, 2Tr in next Tr, Ch2, Sk2ch. Sl st in 3rd Ch to join. Ch6.

R14. [Sk2ch, Tr in next 7Tr, Ch4 Sk4ch, Tr in next 7Tr, Ch3, Sk2ch, Tr in next Tr, Ch3] 9 times. Sk2ch, Tr in next 7Tr, Ch4 Sk4ch, Tr in next 7Tr, Ch3, Sk2ch. Sl st in 3rd Ch to join. Ch6.

R15. [Sk3ch, Tr2tog, Tr in next 5Tr, Ch3 Sk4ch, Tr in next 5Tr, Tr2tog, Ch3, Sk3ch, 2Tr in next Tr, Ch3] 9 times. Sk3ch, Tr2tog, Tr in next 5Tr, Ch3, Sk4ch, Tr in next 5Tr, Tr2tog, Ch3, Sk3ch, Tr in next Tr. Sl st in 3rd Ch to join. Ch5.

R16. [Sk3ch, Tr2tog, Tr in next 4Tr, Ch2, Sk3ch, Tr in next 4Tr, Tr2tog, Ch2, Sk3ch, Tr in next 2Tr, Ch2] 9 times. Sk3ch, Tr2tog, Tr in next 4Tr, Ch2, Sk3ch, Tr in next 4Tr, Tr2tog, Ch2, Sk3ch, Tr in next Tr. Sl st in 3rd Ch to join. Ch5.

R17. [Sk2ch, Tr2tog, Tr in next 3Tr, Ch2, Sk2ch, Tr in next 3Tr, Tr2tog, Ch2, Sk2ch, Tr2tog, Ch2] 9 times. Sk2ch, Tr2tog, Tr in next 3Tr, Ch2, Sk2ch, Tr in next 3Tr, Tr2tog, Ch2, Sk2ch, Tr in next Tr. Sl st in 3rd Ch to join. Ch5.

R18. [Sk2ch, Tr2tog, Tr in next 2Tr, Ch, Sk2ch, Tr in next 2Tr, Tr2tog, Ch2, Sk2ch, Tr in next Tr, Ch2] 9 times. Sk2ch, Tr2tog, Tr in next 2Tr, Ch, Sk2ch, Tr in next 2Tr, Tr2tog, Ch2, Sk2ch.  Sl st in 3rd Ch to join. Ch5.

R19. [Sk2ch, Tr2tog, Tr, Ch, Sk, Tr in next Tr, Tr2tog, Ch2, Sk2ch, Tr in next Tr, Ch2] 9 times. Sk2ch, Tr2tog, Tr, Ch, Sk, Tr in next Tr, Tr2tog, Ch2, Sk2ch.  Sl st in 3rd Ch to join. Ch2

R20. Htr all around. Slst in 2nd Ch to join. Finish off and work in ends.

As ever comments and clarifications are welcome. This should be a fairly quick and easy project for all that the instructions might look a bit complicated. I think it would look really nice in sunny autumnal colours too!

The finished beret

The finished beret

Oo la la!

Oo la la!


Waltzing Fans Shawl

Waltzing Fans shawl

Waltzing fans shawl

I made this pretty shawl out of wool ‘worsted’ thread from The Handweaver’s Studio I think it could equally be made from lace weight yarn without any problems and would be larger and more of a shawl rather than perhaps a shawlette!

I used 50g of the thread which wasn’t marked for meterage. I couldn’t say I’m afraid how much lace weight you would need. I’m going to guess at 100-150g and hide behind the sofa when you throw missiles at me for getting it wrong.

If you make this pattern in laceweight yarn please let me know what meterage you used in the comments!

EDIT: I also used a 2mm hook.

I call it the waltzing fans because the edge of the shawl has a ripple on it like dancers rising and falling as they waltz round the ballroom.

It is based on the fan stitch octagon from Melody Griffiths’ 201 Crochet Motifs Blocks Projects and Ideas but only half the round is completed before turning and the pattern is expanded with a pretty edging.

Instructions as follows:

Notation British. ch= chain, dc= double crochet, tr= treble, sl st= slip stitch, sp= space, [] repeat direction in brackets as directed, fan = 3tr 1ch 3tr

Make 8ch. Sl st in 1st ch to form a ring.

R1. 4ch [3tr in ring 1ch] 7 times. 2tr in ring. sl st in 3rd ch

R2. Sl st in 1st sp. 4ch 3tr in same sp.  [1ch make fan in next sp] 3 times.  1ch 3tr in next sp 1ch 1tr in same sp. ch4 turn.

R3. 3tr in ch1 sp. [1ch 1tr in next sp, 1ch 1fan in next space] 3 times. 1ch 1tr in next sp, 1ch 3tr in next sp 1ch 1tr in same sp. ch4 turn. (1 tr between each fan)

R4. 3tr in ch1 sp. *[1ch 1tr in next sp] twice  1ch 1fan in next space repeat section from* 3 times. [1ch 1tr in next sp] twice, 1ch 3tr in next sp 1ch 1tr in same sp. ch4 turn. (2 tr between each fan)

R5-R12. As for R3 and R4 Start each row 3tr in ch1 sp. Alternate 1ch 1tr across between each fan or edging. Each tr to be worked into the ch1 sp below. Between each fan or edging (half fan) the number of times you [1ch 1tr] increases  by 1 with each row i.e. for R5 there are 3 tr between each fan for R6 there are 4tr between each fan etc. Fans should always line up and be worked into the ch1 sp of the fan below. Count carefully it is easy to miss a tr into the spaces next to fans. At the end of each row work 3tr into final sp 1ch 1tr into same sp. 4ch and turn.

First few rows of the shawl

First few rows of the shawl

You should have between each fan:

R5.  [1ch 1tr] 3 times and 1ch

R6. [1ch 1tr] 4 times and 1ch

R7. [1ch 1tr] 5 times and 1ch

R8. [1ch 1tr] 6 times and 1ch

R9. [1ch 1tr] 7 times and 1ch

R10. [1ch 1tr] 8 times and 1ch

R11. [1ch 1tr] 9 times and 1ch

R12. [1ch 1tr] 10 times and 1ch

R13. 3tr in ch1 sp. *[1ch 1tr in next sp] 6 times 1ch 1tr in same sp [1ch 1tr in next sp] 5 times, 1ch 1fan in next space, repeat section from * 3 times. [1ch 1tr in next sp] 6 times 1ch 1tr in same sp [1ch 1tr in next sp] 5 times, 1ch 3tr in final sp 1ch 1tr in same sp. ch4 turn.

R14. 3tr in ch1 sp. *[1ch 1tr in next sp] 5 times 1ch sk 1 sp, 1fan in 2nd sp, [1ch 1tr in next sp] 5 times, 1ch 1fan in next space,

repeat section from * 3 times. [1ch 1tr in next sp] 5 times 1ch sk 1 sp, 1fan in 2nd sp, [1ch 1tr in next sp] 5 times, 1ch 3tr in final sp 1ch 1tr in same sp. 4ch and turn.

R15 – R23. Begin each row 3tr in ch1 sp. *Work [1ch 1tr in next sp] across to next fan. Fan in next fan sp. Repeatfrom *  across row until edging is reached end each row with 3tr in final sp 1ch 1tr in same sp, 4ch turn.

You should have between each fan or edging section:

R15. [1ch 1tr] 6 times and 1ch

R16. [1ch 1tr] 7 times and 1ch

R17. [1ch 1tr] 8 times and 1ch

R18. [1ch 1tr] 9 times and 1ch

R19. [1ch 1tr] 10 times and 1ch

R20. [1ch 1tr] 11 times and 1ch

R21. [1ch 1tr] 12 times and 1ch

R22. [1ch 1tr] 13 times and 1ch

R23. [1ch 1tr] 14 times and 1ch

R24. 3tr in ch1 sp. *[1ch 1tr in next sp] 8 times 1ch 1tr in same sp [1ch 1tr in next sp] 7 times, 1ch 1fan in next space, repeat section from * 7 times. [1ch 1tr in next sp] 8 times 1ch 1tr in same sp [1ch 1tr in next sp] 7 times, 1ch 3tr in final sp 1ch 1tr in same sp. ch4 turn.

R25. 3tr in ch1 sp. *[1ch 1tr in next sp] 7 times 1ch sk 1 sp, 1fan in 2nd sp, [1ch 1tr in next sp] 7 times, 1ch 1fan in next space, repeat section from * 7 times. [1ch 1tr in next sp] 7 times 1ch sk 1 sp, 1fan in 2nd sp, [1ch 1tr in next sp] 7 times, 1ch 3tr in final sp 1ch 1tr in same sp. 4ch turn.

R26 – R33. Begin each row 3tr in ch1 sp. *Work [1ch 1tr in next sp] across to next fan. Fan in next fan sp. Repeat from * across row until edging is reached end each row with 3tr in final sp 1ch 1tr in same sp, 4ch turn.

You should have between each fan or edging section:

This pattern really needs blocking

This pattern really needs blocking

R26. [1ch 1tr] 8 times and 1ch

R27. [1ch 1tr]9 times and 1ch

R28. [1ch 1tr] 10 times and 1ch

R29. [1ch 1tr] 11 times and 1ch

R30. [1ch 1tr] 12 times and 1ch

R31. [1ch 1tr] 13 times and 1ch

R32. [1ch 1tr] 14 times and 1ch

R33. [1ch 1tr] 15 times and 1ch

R34 As for R26-33 but only 1ch at end. Turn.

R35. Dc to end of row. Ch4 turn.

R36-38 See diagram.

Any questions or clarifications please let me know in the comments and I will try to sort you out as soon as possible. Enjoy!


Apology

So… I have been meaning to post about my lovely shawl which I blocked all  of a couple of weeks ago now.

I didn’t want to post about it without the pattern and getting the pattern written up has been something of a faff. So in the meantime here are some pretty pictures. I promise the pattern with charts will be up shortly.

Waltzing Fans Shawl

Waltzing Fans Shawl

Waltzing fans at the window

Waltzing fans at the window

Sorry.


Pigs’ cheeks – or what happens when I shop at Waitrose

Frying pigs' cheeks

Frying pigs' cheeks

A few years ago my fella gave me a copy of Fergus Henderson’s Nose to Tail Eating I’ve made a couple of things out of it, with limited success, but it’s definitely inspired me to be a bit more adventurous with choosing cuts of meat. As I think it has everyone.  It also fits with my philosophy that if you’re going to cause an animal to be killed for your eating pleasure you should have the good courtesy to eat as much of it as is edible. Now I have to confess to having limits on this personally. I’m not a huge fan of tripe. I’ve yet to be able to bring myself to eat brain or sweetbreads. I’m not keen on kidneys. So saying I’m well up for liver. I think heart is absolutely delicious. I have enjoyed a pig’s ear and snout when roast.

So when Waitrose had a packet of what turned out to be seven cheeks for £1.37(!) I was straight in there. Good call, Quincey! It turns out pigs’ cheeks have the tenderness and flavour of pork belly without the thick strip of fat on the outside. Mmmmmm…

Cheeks nicely browned

Cheeks nicely browned

Henderson’s recipe called for the cheeks to be brined for three or four days and frankly I couldn’t be doing with that so I did a quick internet search and came up with this recipe. Another good call. People this was a serious hit.

Now I did fiddle a little bit but not so you’d notice. So here are where I cut corners:

The recipe calls for the cheeks to be seasoned floured and fried. I have the fear of salting meat too early in the braising or stewing process and making it tough so I skipped the seasoning.

Pretty coloured veggies

Pretty coloured veggies

I used red onions because that’s what I had to hand. I also played fairly fast and loose with the quantities of vegetables. I was already making a funny amount because I had seven cheeks so I wasn’t going to be overly fussy about making sure I had everything too perfect.

I didn’t   brown them either I just let them get to being really soft and the onion to being transparent and clearly well cooked.

I didn’t have caraway seeds, I had aniseeds so substituted those. I may have used slightly less than the recipe would have demanded if scaled up for seven cheeks exactly but seriously it looked like a lot of aniseed already and it’s pretty potent stuff.

Caramelising nicely

Caramelising nicely

I went for a run with my half marathon buddies while it was all in the oven so it may not have had exactly four hours. It might have been slightly over. As if that makes a difference.

We had a nice run though. It’s been a very beautiful spring here in London. All sunshine and daffodils and birdsong. After a grim old winter and a shockingly bad summer last year we’ve earned it frankly.

It was still quite cool and brisk when I made these (this post is a couple of weeks late I’m afraid) now it’s almost summery so I’m not sure you’d want to make them unless we have a cold snap. Still I feel I should get the post up now or I never will.

Before they went in the oven

Before they went in the oven

Of course I came back from the run absolutely ravenous. I had some mash ready to heat up with them and washed some baby spinach to go on the side.

I did not bother to strain out the vegetables. I mean come on! Really? Chuck out all those lovely simmered down veg?

Nah!

So this is what it looked like when all served up…

Pig's cheeks with mash and baby spinach

Pig's cheeks with mash and baby spinach

I was surprised at how well the flavours blended. I would never have put aniseed in with tomato before but they melted in together and the result was warm and subtle and smooth. This was one of the nicest things I’ve made in ages. Posh comfort food. The kind of thing you’d get in a really good gastropub. There being so much of it I had some more with a friend the next day and froze a portion too.

I will definitely be buying these again. The only trouble is, that means going to Waitrose and I always end up spending three times as much as I mean to when I go in there.

Ho hum…


Possibly the world’s easiest and most satisfying pattern

Ewes Full Acres Blue Passion Yarn

Ewes Full Acres Blue Passion Yarn

The gorgeous and generous Ms Playful gave me a skein of Ewes FullAcres handspun and handdyed blue passion wool yarn. I’d been eyeballing this stuff thinking it’s rather bright for my normal wear and I wasn’t sure what to do with it. Ms Playful suggested slippers but I wasn’t convinced. I normally have hot feet rather than cold ones and the idea of wearing slippers seems foolish to me.

Then I saw this lovely pattern on Ravelry and knew that I should give it a try. After all when  I visit my parents’ house the stone farmhouse floors are flipping chilly and a pair of cosy footmitts seem like an excellent idea.

I’m so glad I did. There was something incredibly satisfying about this pattern. It genuinely is super easy to adapt so you make the slippers exactly the right size for your feet. Look though aren’t they cute!

Hooray slippers!

Hooray slippers!

I took a couple of tries to get the width right. The key is to make the initial circle really quite small compared to your actual toes. Squish it in half to see the actual diameter across your feet. Be aware that the first  couple of rows without increasing will still add width to the slippers.

I would suggest that you want to err on the small side and let the slippers cling and stretch over your feet rather than make them loose. Particularly if like me you make the opening on the top fairly big and low. The yarn will relax with time anyway and they will get bigger.

Anyway, I have wide feet and find buying shoes a bit of a trauma so making something for my feet that fit just right was a very cheering experience. They worked up super quickly taking just one evening of watching old episodes of Hill Street Blues on Channel4.com. I can imagine that I would make these again for gifts and I think they would look lovely with various forms of decoration for those that like that sort of thing. Me, I’m happy to keep these simple. I think the variegation from the yarn is decoration enough.

Anyone else made anything so simple and satisfying lately?


Jelly Whip – or why I should trust my instincts

Proportions are funny things. It’s easy to get the a little wonky. And sometimes it’s even easier to get them a lot wonky.

I’m sitting here eating a sort of home made gelato. It wasn’t what I set out to make but it tastes quite nice and frankly I’m happy to have rescued my recipe so that’s all good.

You want to know the  story of how I came to be eating an unintended gelato? Are you sitting comfortably? Then I’ll begin.

My darling mother told my darling sister and me how to make jelly whip not so long ago when she was up in town. It sounded good. She subsequently emailed a recipe which goes as follows:

JELLY WHIP

1 pkt jelly, any flavouf                 3/4pt hot water

1 small tin evaporated milk – refrigerated for several hours

A 1 pint mould or dish

  1. Dissolve the jelly in the hot, but not quite boiling, water, and leave to set.
  2. When the jelly is thickening but not set, whisk the evaporated milk in a large mixing bowl until a very thick foam.
  3. Whisk in the setting jelly.
  4. Pour into mould/dish etc. and leave to set.

A variation – before stage 2: pour a quarter of the jelly into the serving dish and leave to set.  Continue as above and turn out the whole thing set with a clear layer atop and decorate with fruit.

Being my mama she entitled her email “jelly whip” and started it with the phrase “Let’s see what your spam-check makes of that title.” ! I love you mum!

Peach juice and gelatine

Peach juice and gelatine

It sounds like a piece of cake to be honest and readily open to adaptation so I thought I’d have a go at the posh version. I had a tin of evaporated milk in the cupboard so I stuck it in the fridge overnight. I coudn’t remember ever seeing a smaller evaporated milk tin,  this one was regular tin sized so I assumed that’s what the recipe meant. Ahem.

I wanted to make a peach jelly so I bought some peach juice from the corner shop and set to with the gelatine. I got the quantities a little off using the full pint of peach to make the jelly but I reckoned that would probably be ok. BTW I should emphasise the importance of not playing fast and loose with the instructions on gelatine packets. You can end up with some really nasty stringy, lumpy, goopy messes if you do. Even I try very hard to stick to the rules with this stuff.

While it was setting I went for it with the whisk and the tin of milk. Not every recipe I make involves whisking but somehow I’ve been doing quite a bit of it lately. Things come in phases I guess.

Just beginning whisking the milk

Just beginning whisking the milk

I was pretty amazed by how much volume can be created so easily in this process. The milk fluffed up like nobodies business. It was fun. But I began to become a little concerned…

Because I realised that of course this was not a small tin of evaporated milk. This was probably double the size of a small tin. As I whisked some more and the milk expanded further I thanked my lucky stars for the size of my mixing bowl and started to worry properly that I hadn’t made enough jelly to properly flavour and set the milk.

When I whipped in the jelly I knew I was right. There was barely any flavour except a slight souring of the milk.

Bleugh!

Frothy and fluffy

Frothy and fluffy

I didn’t have much more peach juice and I didn’t trust it to provide enough flavour anyway. I needed to think of something else. Meanwhile time was ticking and what I had already made was setting.

Gah!

I rifled through my various cupboards rejecting spices and colourings and inappropriate alcohol until my fingers grasped a bottle of almond flavouring. Aha! I don’t know if you’ve had fruit- almond combinations but can I recommend amaretto and orange juice as a good way to start exploring them. Add a good dash of lemon juice if that sounds too sweet.

I made up another jelly with the remaining peach juice and poured in a goodly splash of almond flavouring. I poured it slowly at height into the milk to help cool it on its way in. In it went but the flavour was still too mild.

More almond. Still not much flavour. More almond… meh, stil a bit bland. More almond and now I’m worried about overdosing on almond essence, but at last I have something that tastes good.

Oh and I should also mention, could fill a small bathtub.

Big bowlful of jelly whip

Big bowlful of jelly whip

Yes, in my drive to finish making the stuff I had left aside all sense of proportion and allowed myself to create a dessert that would occupy 3/4 of the space in my fridge.

Clearly it was time to call in the professionals.

Once it set I got on the phone to my sometimes fella and put in a plea. “I need my fridge back! Will you help?”

He was on the bus practically before I’d finished the call.

Between us we got through about a third of it straight off.

That sounds like a huge amount but it really is mostly air. His comment was that he had never eaten anything so light and fluffy. I blended some frozen berries to go with it which was a good call. (Sorry no pictures of this. It was yummy and we snaffled it before I remembered to take any.)

When he left I packed him a boxful to take home. It was set quite successfully and didn’t collapse on the journey.

I wasn’t sure I could eat the rest before it went off but it occurred to me that it might freeze ok. And I was right. It’s slightly chewy compared to, say, ice cream, but still very nice.

I definitely want to try to make this again but next time I will definitely search around for a small tin of milk. I will also use a stronger flavour of juice to make the jelly. Cherry I think would be nice or perhaps ditch the juice altogether and make it with coffee.

Anyway, I will get back to my thawing pudding and look forward to hearing about your last minute rescues. What have you made that required quick thought and a splash of something out the cupboard to sort it out? Tell me in the comments.